Rimm-Kaufman, S., & Sawyer, B. (2004). Primary-Grade Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Attitudes toward Teaching, and Discipline and Teaching Practice Priorities in Relation to the “Responsive Classroom” Approach. The Elementary School Journal, 104(4), 321-341.

Findings showed that teachers who reported using more Responsive Classroom (RC) practices reported greater self-efficacy beliefs and teaching practice priorities that were consistent with those of the RC approach. Teachers at RC schools were also more likely to report positive attitudes toward teaching as a profession and to hold disciplinary and teaching practice priorities that were aligned with the goals of the RC approach. Findings are discussed in relation to the teacher and school changes that accompanied implementation of the RC approach.

Burkhauser, Susan (2016) How Much Do School Principals Matter When It Comes to Teacher Working Conditions? Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis.

This report studied teacher perceptions of working conditions as influenced by principals to see how it effects retention. Based on four areas of working conditions (teacher time use, physical environment, teacher empowerment/school leadership, professional development), the study found that principles enacting positive working condition policies can play a role in whether teachers remain in their schools.

Voltz, Deborah, Sims, Michele and Nelson, Betty (2010). Supporting the Classroom with Materials for Instruction. ASCD.

This is a chapter from a book called Connecting Teachers, Students, and Standards. The chapter offers multiple methods to maintain similar learning gains in diverse student populations. It starts with an explanation of a Universal Design for Learning and models many different techniques, including but not limited to auditory, visual, cultural, and technological methods.

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Ghamraw, Norma (2013). Teachers Helping Teachers: A Professional Development Model that Promotes Teacher Leadership . International Education Studies. 

Paper outlining the conceptual framework of teachers leaders’ professional learning skills developing as a result of being a presenter in profession development for other teachers. The paper explores specific gains in this collaborative method of teacher professional growth, in addition to ways students can take part and develop leadership principles.