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Kalogrides, D., Loeb, S., & Béteille, T. (2011). Power Play?  Teacher Characteristic sand Class Assignments. Urban Institute.

Although more effective (higher value-added) teachers and those with advanced degrees are also assigned less difficult classes, controlling for these factors does not eliminate the association between experience, race, gender, and assignments. The authors hypothesize that this pattern of class assignments results, in part, from power relations among teachers within a school, a process that works to disadvantage those with less experience and from minority and female backgrounds, as well as from parental pressures. These patterns have negative implications for teacher retention given the importance of working conditions for teachers’ career decisions.

 

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Donaldson, M. L. (2011). Principals’ Approaches to Developing Teacher Quality. Center for American Progress.

The way principals hire teachers, assign them to specific positions, evaluate them, and provide growth opportunities for them can have significant effects on teacher quality. The authors of this report explore the influences on how principals hire, assign, evaluate, and provide professional development to teachers.  In addition the article provides suggestions on how to overcome the constraints encountered during this process.

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Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education. (2008). Assigning Students to Classes. Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education; Johns Hopkins University.

Creating classroom assignments that work for students and for teachers requires creative and thoughtful planning. This article outlines the process looking at the elementary and secondary level with the goal of creating manageable, heterogeneous classes that reflect the naturally-occurring proportions of students with disabilities at each grade level — while still grouping students in ways that allow special education services to be provided effectively.

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Haman, E. & Reeves, J. (2008). Accessing High-Quality Instructional Strategies. California Department of Education & University of California, Davis, School of Education.

This document details why the class-size reduction did not increase access to high quality instruction and narrow the achievement gap: increased demand and movement of experienced teachers to wealthier districts.  It also explores the key question when reducing class size: Are experienced, well-trained teachers available or is there time to develop these teachers?