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SEDL Letter. (2007). Developing a Staff of Learners. SEDL.

Professional learning communities (PLCs) are more than just collaborative working arrangements or faculty groups that meet regularly. A PLC is a way of working where staff engage in purposeful, collegial learning. This learning is intentional and its purpose is to improve staff effectiveness so students will be more successful learners. Strategies are suggested to create favorable conditions for PLCs.

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Kassissieh, J. & Barton, R. (2009). The Top Priority: Teacher Learning. Principal Leadership.

When collaboration is embedded in teachers’ work and supported by leadership, meaningful professional learning and improved teaching follow. This article reviews a school’s journey in developing a common vision and embedded collaboration. Practical strategies are shared.

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Farr, S. (2010). Leadership, Not Magic. Educational Leadership.

This article defines, based on research on high performing teachers, the traits which make these teachers successful.  High-performing teachers are leaders in their classroom who set big goals, get students invested in learning, plan purposefully, execute effectively, continually improve, and work relentlessly.

 

 

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Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement (2009). Developing a Positive School Climate. Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement.

The authors of this brief define school climate and make suggestions for administrators to assess the quality of their school climate. The article lists examples of ways to address specific challenges to improving school climate.

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Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement (2007). Using the Classroom Walk-Through as an Instructional Leadership Strategy. Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement.

The author of this report explains the duration, focus and feedback necessary to make walk-throughs effective in improving teacher performance.

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Lewis, D., Madison-Lewis, R., Muoneke, A., and Times, C. (2010). Using Data to Guide Instruction and Improve Student Learning. SEDL.

Using data effectively is an essential strategy for school improvement and reform. This article describes how districts in three states used data effectively to improve student performance and drive school improvement.

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National Association of Secondary School Principals (2011). The Master Schedule: A Culture Indicator. National Association of Secondary School Principals.

The school schedule provides insights into a school’s priorities.  Implementing the strategies outlined in this article can help to ensure that the school schedule is focused on improving student learning and teaching conditions.

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San Antonio D. M. & Salzfass E. A. (2007). How We Treat One Another in School. ASCD.

The article explains the traumatic effects of bullying on school climate. The article provides suggestions for teachers and administrators to mitigate bullying using proactive strategies such as hallway monitoring and relationship building. Recommendations are made for a school-wide approach to bullying prevention.