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Thompson, M. & Goe, L. (2009). Models for Effective and Scalable Teacher Professional Development. Educational Testing Service.

Drawing on learning theory, expertise research, and research on effective professional development, this paper presents the theoretical and empirical basis behind an evolving program of professional development that employs school-embedded teacher learning communities as a central component, called Keeping Learning on Track®.

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National Education Association. (2006). Professional Community & Professional Development. National Education Association.

This brief provides a research-based blueprint for teacher learning, including the goals it can serve, strategic content priorities, and effective approaches or strategies. In “learning centered” schools—where there is an emphasis on both student and teacher learning—teacher professional communities are the hub of a learning system that focuses on instructional improvement. These communities are strategically linked with various other modes of professional development within and outside the school.

Click to open resource. Sawchuk, S. (2010). Professional Development: Sorting Through the Jumble to Achieve Success. Education Week. This report summarizes recent research on effective professional development including findings on summer institutes, embedded professional development, and ways to allocate funding for professional development. The report includes several case studies focusing on teachers’ perspectives of professional development.

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Kalogrides, D., Loeb, S., & Béteille, T. (2011). Power Play?  Teacher Characteristic sand Class Assignments. Urban Institute.

Although more effective (higher value-added) teachers and those with advanced degrees are also assigned less difficult classes, controlling for these factors does not eliminate the association between experience, race, gender, and assignments. The authors hypothesize that this pattern of class assignments results, in part, from power relations among teachers within a school, a process that works to disadvantage those with less experience and from minority and female backgrounds, as well as from parental pressures. These patterns have negative implications for teacher retention given the importance of working conditions for teachers’ career decisions.

 

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Danielson, C. (2007). The Many Faces of Leadership. Educational Leadership; ASCD.

Building a collaborative school culture is not possible without the help of effective teacher leaders. In this research report, the author explains the power of good teacher leadership in building collaboration and provides several conditions that promote leadership.

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SEDL Letter. (2007). Developing a Staff of Learners. SEDL.

Professional learning communities (PLCs) are more than just collaborative working arrangements or faculty groups that meet regularly. A PLC is a way of working where staff engage in purposeful, collegial learning. This learning is intentional and its purpose is to improve staff effectiveness so students will be more successful learners. Strategies are suggested to create favorable conditions for PLCs.