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Flannagan, J. S. & Kelly, M. (2009). Differentiated Support. Principal Leadership.

In order for all teachers to receive continuous learning experiences, professional development and support must be differentiated based on teacher need. This guide discusses responsive professional development and steps necessary to implement professional development based on an individual teacher’s needs.

 

 

 

Click to open resource. Sawchuk, S. (2010). Professional Development: Sorting Through the Jumble to Achieve Success. Education Week. This report summarizes recent research on effective professional development including findings on summer institutes, embedded professional development, and ways to allocate funding for professional development. The report includes several case studies focusing on teachers’ perspectives of professional development.

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Rodríguez, R. G., López del Bosque, R., & Villarreal, A. (2008). Creating Culturally Responsive Parent Engagement. Intercultural Development Research Association.

Viewing parent involvement from a culturally responsive perspective, the article includes strategies to encourage educators to reflect on their practices to involve parents and make space for effective family engagement.

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Ferlazzo, L. (2011). Involvement or Engagement?. ASCD.

To create the kinds of school-family partnerships that raise student achievement, improve local communities, and increase public support, educators need to understand the difference between family involvement and family engagement. This article discusses how to expand meaningful possibilities for partnerships with families.

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 Edutopia. Community-Built School: Working Together to Make a Change. Edutopia.

This video describes the creation of an elementary school that is dependent on parents and a large number of volunteers. The principal led the process, based on her vision of in-depth community involvement that values diverse perspectives. The school is built on collaborative and cooperative learning.

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Johnson, J. (2011). What’s Trust Got to Do with It? A Communications and Engagement Guide for School Leaders Tackling the Problem of Persistently Failing Schools. Public Agenda.

This guide focuses on supporting family engagement in persistently failing schools. Eight ideas that can help leaders build trust and promote constructive dialogue are discussed.

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Anderson, J. A. et al. (2006). Increasing Parent Involvement in Education: A Resource Guide for South Carolina Communities. South Carolina Council on Competitiveness.

This resource provides the tools necessary to develop and implement a strategic plan to ensure continual improvement in family engagement. The Inventory of Present Practices might be of particular interest for school leaders. This inventory will help educators identify school’s present practices for each of the six types of involvement that create a comprehensive program of school, family, and community partnerships. A survey is also provided that could be given to families to identify ways to improve the school’s family collaboration.

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Adelman, H. & Taylor, L. (2007). Fostering School, Family, and Community Involvement. The Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory.

This guidebook provides an overview of the nature and scope of collaboration, explores barriers to effectively working together, and discusses the processes of establishing and sustaining the work. It also reviews the importance of using data, issues related to sharing information, and examples of collaborative efforts from around the country.

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Heather B. Weiss, H. B.,  Lopez, M. E. & Rosenberg, H. (2010). Beyond Random Acts Family, School, and Community Engagement as an Integral Part of Education Reform. Harvard Family Research Project.

This report discusses engagement in a way to involve parents in school improvement and transform low performing schools to intentionally align involvement with student achievement and learning.

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Minority Community Outreach. (2010). Minority Parent and Community Engagement: Best Practices and Policy Recommendations for Closing the Gaps in Student Achievement. Minority Community Outreach.

This report identifies general practices for engaging minority parents, discusses the dynamics that hinder parent involvement, explores successful strategies that strengthen parent engagement for closing the achievement gap, and identifies recommendations to improve parental engagement policies.