Click to open resource.

Bottoms, G. and Schmidt-Davis, J. (2010). The Three Essentials: Improving Schools Requires District Vision, District and State Support, and Principal Leadership. Southern Regional Education Board.

The authors of this report outline the necessary steps by which district and school leadership can ensure school improvement. Seven strategies are described: these include establishing a clear strategic framework, providing instructional coherence, and providing high-quality data.

Click to open resource.

Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement (2009). Developing a Positive School Climate. Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement.

The authors of this brief define school climate and make suggestions for administrators to assess the quality of their school climate. The article lists examples of ways to address specific challenges to improving school climate.

Click here to open resource

Center for Social and Emotional Education. (2010). School Climate Research Summary. Center for Social and Emotional Education.

This report suggests that “[s]chool climate is based on patterns of people’s experiences of school life and reflects norms, goals, values, interpersonal relationships, teaching and learning practices, and organizational structures.” This research brief reviews current trends in school climate and provides suggestions to improve conditions for safety, learning, teaching, and relationships.

Click to open resource.

The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement (2005). What Does the Research Tell Us About Teacher Leadership? The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement.

One of the most effective strategies for school improvement is to nurture teacher leaders. The authors of this report describe necessary conditions for teacher leaders to thrive.

Click to open resource.

Jerald, C. D. (2006). School Culture: “The Hidden Curriculum”. Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement.

The author addresses the organizational culture of schools and how leadership can foster vision and values that ultimately result in a positive, supportive school culture. Focusing on personal relationships, goal alignment, and high expectations, the article includes advice from principals of schools that went beyond cultivating a safe and nurturing environment in an effort to drive school improvement.

Click to open resource.

Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement (2007). Using the Classroom Walk-Through as an Instructional Leadership Strategy. Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement.

The author of this report explains the duration, focus and feedback necessary to make walk-throughs effective in improving teacher performance.

Click to open resource.

Bureau of School Improvement (2009). Strategies for Evaluating Your School Improvement Process. Florida Department of Education.

This guide provides strategies to evaluate efforts in improving teaching and learning conditions and progress toward goals in the School Improvement Plan. These actionable steps for ensuring progress in improvement include questions to ask before, during, and after the process.

 

Click to open resource.

Center for Social and Emotional Education (2012). Cultivating Caring Learning Communities. National School Climate Center.

In order for an atmosphere of trust and respect to be pervasive, it must be cultivated in the classroom. This resource guide provides classroom activities to support positive social and emotional growth in order to improve teaching and learning conditions. Suggestions are made to increase parental involvement in improving the school climate.

Click to open resource.

Lewis, D., Madison-Lewis, R., Muoneke, A., and Times, C. (2010). Using Data to Guide Instruction and Improve Student Learning. SEDL.

Using data effectively is an essential strategy for school improvement and reform. This article describes how districts in three states used data effectively to improve student performance and drive school improvement.