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National Association of Secondary School Principals (2011). The Master Schedule: A Culture Indicator. National Association of Secondary School Principals.

The school schedule provides insights into a school’s priorities.  Implementing the strategies outlined in this article can help to ensure that the school schedule is focused on improving student learning and teaching conditions.

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Méndez-Morse, S. (1992). Leadership Characteristics that Facilitate School Change. SEDL.

The author of this report reviews the history of educational leadership and discusses essential strategies for school improvement including vision, valuing human resources, focusing on student learning, taking risks, listening, and being proactive.

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Hitch, C. (2004). Quiet Leadership: Tips for Leading Effectively Behind the Scenes. LEARN NC.

In this posting, the author shares ideas for how administrators can lead effectively during the hectic months before state testing. Successful quiet leadership depends on visibility in the school, subtle recognition of staff accomplishments, focusing on instruction, and removing obstacles for success.

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Bryk, A. S. and Schneider, B. (2003). Trust in Schools: A Core Resource for School Reform. ASCD.

This article emphasizes the importance of social and relational trust to school improvement. Strategies to develop mutual respect and trust are discussed. Strategies include listening during conflict, displaying openness to new ideas, demonstrating competence in core responsibilities, and exhibiting integrity and follow through.

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Stoll, L. and Temperley, J. (2009). Improving School Leadership: The Toolkit. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

This toolkit is designed to help educators analyze their current school leadership policies and practices, and “develop a common understanding of where and how to take action.” In order to sustain improvements, leadership is presented as four elements of a cycle that includes analysis, auditing, prioritizing, and communicating.

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Cowan, D. (2009). Creating a Community of Professional Learners: An Inside View. SEDL.

Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) build collegiality and drive school improvement by focusing on teaching and learning. In this article, the author presents six steps to improving the quality of work produced by PLCs.

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Seikaly, L. (2012). Tips from School Improvement Leaders. School Improvement in Maryland.

A common obstacle for school improvement is too many demands and too little time. The author of this article discusses the aligned school improvement process, which prioritizes tasks and clarifies problems and goals. Eight suggestions are made to align school improvement efforts.

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Oregon Department of Education and University of Oregon (2010). Conduct Classroom Walkthroughs Regularly and Provide Effective Feedback. University of Oregon.

Classroom walkthroughs are an effective, informal way to provide immediate and actionable feedback for teachers. This guide includes the tools that administrators need to start providing effective feedback during walkthroughs. Key concepts of walkthroughs are discussed and tools for application are included.